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I believe we should develop simple and inexpensive robots that exist to harvest energy, process data, replicate, and ‘die’ like ordinary life forms. We need to research already proven biological systems to provide insight for new directions in the field of robotics. Two great developing forces are BEAM robotics and a practical commercial outlet of them at solarbotics.com

What is important with these types of robots is that there is no ‘brain’ needed to operate. Most species of life don’t have a brain to speak of, notably jellyfish. They manage to survive and reproduce effectively without one. With the simplest robot design in mind we can create a sustainable network of autonomous machines.

Using energy from the sun is obviously the first source. But using this harvested energy is inefficient for locomotive use. Instead, chemical energy should replace it while the electricity is used solely to process information. The fuel should be a digested mass of organic matter. The resulting composition should be full of potential chemical energy to be consumed by cell-like chemical engines.

The use of a microcontroller and radio communication can organize these machines by processing a real-time virtual array. Each robot is aware of each other and a botmaster signal for reprogramming. Within this neural net (array) each individual robot will provide statistical feedback. When a majority of the robots can detect an unexpected drop in light exposure, for example when a large cloud passes, it will trigger every machine instantly to go into a low power hibernation. You could compare this to when a flock of birds take off simultaneously when only one is startled to flight.

The application of these simplistic robots is not commonly approached. Their purpose is to exist self sufficiently and provide a small cloud computing array. Consider the microcontroller as the thought organ, it’s radio is a communicating organ, and the chemical actuators used to move is akin to their muscles. Providing a biological parallel allows these machines to emulate the proven systems in life today.

Why not consider other uses for these machines? Providing difficult tasks requires specific programming which makes it less autonomous. Receiving feedback from the simple data can provide clues to help the machines to evolve. And as the machines become better at their simple task of gathering energy and computing, a massive resource of computing power becomes available. Maybe the PC’s of the future will be sprawled across your lawn, processing this webpage by cutting your grass and soaking up sun rays. Or maybe the nodes are used globally as brain cells of an omnipresent digital organism…

A solution to our surmounting waste problem is robots. Their job description is already suited for the task: they do tasks repeatedly and unerringly, even in undesirable environments. So why not develop robots for waste management?
There are plenty of automatic sorting machines already established in the recycling industry. However the majority of waste does not get the chance to be recycled. We end up with landfills brimming with recyclable waste.
An idea, I propose, is an autonomous scavenger robot. Many robotics get inspiration from insects and I believe this is a perfect application. It will be mostly autonomous in the sense that it will live, operate, and replicate in waste environments virtually by itself. Being a scavenger by nature, these machines will get their energy anyway they can. In a landfill there is an abundance of energy to be harnessed. Some species of robot will thrive on generating power from food wastes by chemical means. Others will break down plastics inside an electronic stomach to produce energy, and as a side effect, make those plastics available for recycling.
Automating these machines will prove the most difficult process because by inheritance they should self-replicate.

A solution to our surmounting waste problem is robots. Their job description is already suited for the task: they do tasks repeatedly and unerringly, even in undesirable environments. So why not use robots in waste management?
There are plenty of automatic sorting machines established in the recycling industry. However the majority of waste does not get the chance to be recycled. We end up with landfills brimming with recyclable waste.
An idea, I propose, is an autonomous scavenger robot. Many robotics get inspiration from insects and I believe this is a perfect application. It will be mostly autonomous in the sense that it will live, operate, and replicate in waste environments virtually by itself. Being a scavenger by nature, these machines will get their energy anyway they can. In a landfill there is an abundance of energy to be harnessed. Some species of robot will thrive on generating power from food wastes by chemical means. Others will break down plastics inside an electronic stomach to produce energy, and as a side effect, make those plastics available for recycling.
Automating these machines will prove the most difficult process because by inheritance they should self-replicate.

Next post: More thoughts on Robotics

#32: Implant Memory Chips in Our Brains | Dangerous Ideas | Big Think.

In a futurist perspective, these ‘chips’ will allow us to ‘google’ just by thinking, someday. It is only a matter of time, consider the following:

Voice recogition was once poor for a machine, now it’s matured. With voice recognition software you can perform searches just by talking. For example, Vlingo’s voice software on Blackberries and other mobile devices.

Visual recognition, while poor now, it’s expanding quickly.  For example Google’s new image search can discern differences in color with the help of quantum computing. It’s probably not a far fetched idea to assume we’ll be able to ‘Google’ just by looking at something soon.

Mind recognition is at a infantile state. There are some experimental ‘mind-reading’ caps that aren’t invasive in development, even a toy. Invasive  mind-machine interfaces have been around for some time and, while barbaric, interfaces between neurons and transistors have become much more symbiotic. By nature they are similar.

Advances in this technology will also revitalize people with physical disabilities and paralysis. Prosthetics will become more integrated with the available nerves. As we learn to interpret our own bioelectronic signals we can design a more compatible and less invasive system. And it would be nice to google by thinking about it.

USim, a live java application, below, simulates the evolutionary development of two-dimensional artificial lifeforms that move in a liquid environment. At the beginning of the simulation there are randomly generated individuals and a number of food-squares distributed at random. The number of food-squares is determined by the number of existing individuals. This means that the biomass of the whole system is constant. Each individual has a treelike structure defined by a simple genetic code. When an individual encounters a food-square it eats the square, leading to an increase in the indivdual’s life-energy. When an individual reaches a certain age, the statistical probability of reproduction increases along with its life-energy. The asexual reproduction consists of laying eggs, symbolized by yellow squares. Each egg reduces the life-energy of an individual and has to be recharged by consuming additional food-squares. Every new individual inherits the genetic code from its parent, eventually including some minor mutations. An individual dies when it reaches a certain age or when its life-energy has decreased to zero.

via Evolution Simulator in Java.

Part 1 – Transhuman
Part 2 – Preparing for the Singularity
Part 3 – The Digital Messiah

“The accelerating advances in genetics, brain research, artificial intelligence, bionics and nanotechnology seem to converge to one goal: to overcome human limits and create higher forms of intelligent life and to create transhuman life.”

This is a great series exhaustively covering all aspects of the coming technological apocalypse. Must see.

Solar Powered DIY Portable HotSpot @ VoltsXamps

An amazing project in solar development. An array of these autonomous Wifi broadcasters networked together in a web smart grid of sorts will provide blanket WiFi access affordable for entire cities and municipalities. With some clever programming, these devices can distribute the bandwidth load, commonly called “grid computing” or “cloud computing”. Notice the theme?

So can we develop systems to make the internet as accessible as it is open? Free Internet for all? As Moore’s Law marches on this might be inevitable.

 

10 print “Hello World!”;

20 Goto 30

30 print “Welcome electronic travelers! My blog is an exploration of modern and future technology, along with their applications.

I’m not alone in saying we are experiencing an accelerating, irreversible march of technological progress known as the Singularity. We are witnessing the exponential growth all around us.  Do you remember using the internet before Google (B.G.)? When’s the last time you used the postal service to communicate? Can you walk into a crowded place today and not run into someone with a mobile device?

I explore the fascinating breakthroughs in technology bringing us closer to a posthuman era. We probably won’t live to see that time, however, what we leave behind today is what our machine descendants will rely on to understand what being human is.

At least to our advantage the coming technological apocalypse makes life easier.”

40 End;

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